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Advent of elexacaftor/tezacaftor/ivacaftor for cystic fibrosis treatment: What consequences on Aspergillus-related diseases? Preliminary insights

  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to the work.
    Adélaïde Chesnay
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Parasitologie-Mycologie–Médecine Tropicale, Pôle Biologie Médicale, Hôpital Bretonneau, CHRU de Tours, Bâtiment B2A, 1er Étage, 2, Boulevard Tonnellé, Tours 37044 CEDEX 9, France.
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to the work.
    Affiliations
    Parasitologie-Mycologie–Médecine Tropicale, Pôle Biologie Médicale, Hôpital Bretonneau, CHRU de, Tours 37044, France

    Centre d'Etude des Pathologies Respiratoires, Inserm UMR1100, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Tours, 37032, France
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to the work.
    Éric Bailly
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to the work.
    Affiliations
    Parasitologie-Mycologie–Médecine Tropicale, Pôle Biologie Médicale, Hôpital Bretonneau, CHRU de, Tours 37044, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Laure Cosson
    Affiliations
    Centre de Ressources et de Compétences de la Mucoviscidose Pediatrique, Médecine pédiatrique, Pôle Enfant, Hôpital Clocheville, CHRU de, Tours 37044, France
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  • Thomas Flament
    Affiliations
    Centre de Ressources et de Compétences de la Mucoviscidose Adultes, Service Pneumologie et Explorations Fonctionnelles Respiratoires, Pôle Médecine, Hôpital Bretonneau, CHRU de, Tours 37044, France
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  • Guillaume Desoubeaux
    Affiliations
    Parasitologie-Mycologie–Médecine Tropicale, Pôle Biologie Médicale, Hôpital Bretonneau, CHRU de, Tours 37044, France

    Centre d'Etude des Pathologies Respiratoires, Inserm UMR1100, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Tours, 37032, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to the work.
Published:September 20, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcf.2022.09.007
      Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a frequent lethal inherited multi-organ disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. F508del mutation is observed in≈ 90% of Caucasian diseased persons. In CF patients, prolonged colonization with bacteria or molds is responsible for superinfection or sensitization, like allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) which is caused by fungal species belonging to the Aspergillus genus. So far, ABPA has been diagnosed in 8.9% patients [
      • Maturu V.N.
      • Agarwal R.
      Prevalence of Aspergillus sensitization and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in cystic fibrosis: systematic review and meta-analysis.
      ], and is known to be associated with accelerated decline in respiratory function, leading to more frequent hospitalizations compared to non-colonized subjects, as well as damage to the bronchial airways.
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